Leadership Education

LDR 200L

LDR 200L, or “Introduction to Leadership”, is another class required for my leadership minor. The class branches off of LDR 100L, the other introduction class I took my first semester. In LDR 200, much of the focus was put on learning about facilitation and how to properly facilitate in a group. We got to practice with each other, and even got some hands-on experience on our LAS in the D trip in February. Since the class is just for the Leadership students, some of the things discussed were specific to LAS. We prepared as a group for 2017 Cohort competition day, and we completed LAS in the D training. Most of the second half of the semester was spent learning different leadership theories, and listening to workshops about them.

Our entire class was split up into groups and then we were each assigned a different Leadership Theory to present on. My group was lucky got to present first. The theory we were assigned was Leadership Ethics. Our presentation on Leadership Ethics can be found here. The exams we took in that class were all based on the material from the presentations.

As a part of my LAS protocol, I am required to complete 30 hours of community service. I  chose to log my trip I took to Flint as my service hours. When I was researching more about Leadership and Ethics for the presentation I did in my LDR 200L class, I was making connections to how I apply that in my day-to-day life. Part of the Leadership Ethics theory analyzes why people do the things that they do. That really got me thinking about what drives me to make the decisions that I make. Post conventional morality is the mindset most people should have when making choices. Thinking post conventionally is always having others at mind, and not doing things for personal gain. When I volunteered to go to Flint, I initially was thinking about myself, and needing to get the service hours that are required in. However, when I got to Flint and saw what needed to be done, I only had others in mind. I was thinking about what I could do to help out their community, not about how good it would make me look that I was volunteering today. Thinking deeper into what is the reason I do things made me more self-aware. Now that I have a deeper understanding of this, I have been trying to think about it in every situation I am in. It is very easy to be selfish, and think pre conventionally. This is what I am trying to stray away from. I am keeping my eyes open to my decisions, and others in mind.

 

 

 

 

Leadership Education

HST 100L

As part of the LAS protocol, I am required to take a class called the “American Experience”. This class falls under one of the classes I am required to take for a University Requirement, and it counts as a writing intensive credit. We read two books in this class. The first on we read was a collection of documents and essays put together by Mae M. Ngai and Jon Gjerde. The second book was called “Postethnic America”, and it was written by David A. Hollinger. book 2

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Leadership Education

My Why Statement

Simon Sinek’s Ted Talk: How Great Leaders Inspire Action is my favorite Ted Tgolden-circlealk. I watched this Ted Talk my Leadership class, and it truly changed my perspective on how I live my life. The video is about the importance of starting with “why”. Simon goes on to explain what the “golden circle” is. Without even realizing it, most people start explanations with the easiest point to hit on the dart board – the “what” on the outside ring. Explaining what you are doing should not be hard to do, and most of the time how you do it shouldn’t be too complicated either. The difficult part is deciding why you’re doing it.

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Leadership Education

“YES (wo)MAN”

Does leadership come from a “yes” or a “no”?

My initial thoughts were: “No. Leadership comes from a “no. Leaders have to make tough decisions, and saying no can sometimes be difficult to do.” However, the more I’ve researched and looked into it, my thinking was completely wrong. A leader might be able to make tough decisions by saying no, but not a GOOD leader.  In most cases it is more difficult to answer something with a yes. Answering with a yes to things opens things up for discussion. Answering with a no doesn’t leave room for discussion to travel anywhere, it ends it. The word no leaves no room for advancement of any kind. When I researched  this online, I found a quote that I really liked.

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Leadership Education

COM 267L

All CMU students are required to take a speaking class. For LAS, our debate class (COM267L) is our speaking class. Our cohort was split into two different classes, and split up into smaller debate groups. Over the course of the semester, we learned about argumentation and what it should really be like, the processes of formal debate, different forms of persuasion, and common flaws with arguments. I have never been very good at speaking in front of people, and this class was good practice for me. My first debate in class was a little rocky, but things only got better from there. By our last debate, I felt like I had improved a lot, and I got good grades on the debates. The majority of the class was learning about the history of debate, and how things have progresses. My favorite part of the class was getting to learn about the different logical fallacies people use when they are arguing . We only got to learn about 16 different fallacies, but there are around 115 different fallacies. Now that I know about the different fallacies used in argumentation, I will be able to pick them out in other’s arguments, and make sure I don’t use them myself.  The skills I gained from practicing speaking in front of people will stick with me as well.

 

Leadership Education

PSY 100L

As an LAS scholar, I have 3 required classes to take my freshman year of school. Introduction to Leadership Education (LDR 100), Introduction to Psychology (PSY 100L), and Introduction to Debate (COM 267L).

Psychology is the study of the human mind, and why it is the way that it is. Personally, I really enjoyed psychology. I found it extremely interesting to learn the things we learned in class. On the exams we took, he would give us an essay question relating leadership to different psychology components. Having to connect the two helped me understand why taking psychology was important to minor in leadership. As a leader, it is important to understand why some people think the way that they do. This class was one of my favorites for multiple reasons. One, I really liked the Professor, and the way he taught. Two, I liked the content we learned about. I found psychology very interesting, and considered minoring in it. Lastly, I really liked having a class with everyone in my cohort. It was nice to be able to ask questions to people you’re familiar with, and to study with them. Overall, I think psychology was a great class, and I am glad I had the opportunity to take it with such an amazing cohort.

Leadership Education

The Fred Factor

“The Fred Factor” is a book written by Mark Sanborn. In my leadership class, this was the book I was assigned along with the rest of my group to read and present to the class. My group got together, and discussed what we liked about the book, what we thought its purpose was, and what we thought we should do for our project.

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